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Finstas: A positive form of social media

Finstas: A positive form of social media

Skyler Black, Junior Staff Reporter
April 18, 2018
Lenore Skenazy, former New York Daily News columnist and strong advocate for free-range parenting, made a controversial decision to let her 9-year-old son ride the New York City subway alone. (Fair use: Wikipedia Commons)

Unsupervised

Caitlin Jefferson, New Media and Promotions Editor
April 11, 2018
Dissection activities give students a tangible model to assist in their studies (Fair Use: Wikimedia Commons)

Pro: Animal dissections

Olivia Evans, Junior Staff Reporter
March 13, 2018
Con: Animal dissections

Con: Animal dissections

Alyssa Johnston, Junior Staff Reporter
March 13, 2018

“No.”

Alyssa Johnston, Junior Staff Reporter
February 2, 2018
Logan Paul poses on his public Instagram account for his 16.2 million followers.

Why people care so much about Logan Paul

Abbey Roegner, Junior Staff Reporter
January 21, 2018
The Deceptive Charm of Disney Princesses

The Deceptive Charm of Disney Princesses

Colleen Thomson, Junior staff reporter
November 1, 2017
Beauty in competition

Beauty in competition

Alyssa Johnston, Junior Staff Reporter
October 17, 2017
Junior year I completed an intense Link Leader application process, and was one of 44 girls who were selected out of a pool of 111, giving me the opportunity to lead the Pink Crew. (Photo Credit: Mercy Link Crew)

A letter to Mercy freshwomen

Emma Tomsich, Editor-in-Chief
August 29, 2017
Winter is brutal, especially winters here in Michigan. When the dreary winter finally ends, the beautiful season of spring arrives, and with that means different things to different people. Rebirth, more energy, and more motivation are some things that may come to mind. To many Americans and myself, however, the first thing that comes to mind is cleaning.


Spring is the glorious season of the year when about 60 percent of Americans undergo some sort of makeover or spring cleaning, according to SWNS Digital. Anything from a simple manicure or pedicure to scrubbing the entire house occurs among that 60 percent of spring cleaners.


The warmer weather that spring brings is a definite motivator to crack open some windows and the cleaning supplies after being cooped up for a long winter. All throughout the winter, houses are shut and sealed up to protect from the cold, but they also become a home to bacteria. Carpet especially contains mold spores, dust mites, pollen, and many other types of bacteria after the bitter winter season.


It is crucial to reduce allergens and bacteria in order to promote a clean, healthy lifestyle, which is why spring cleaning is so important. It may seem like only parents are responsible for cleaning out the house, or at least parts of it each spring, but something even as simple as running a disinfectant wipe over that dusty desk in your room can improve health and cleanliness in your environment.


Spring cleaning is not only good for physical health, but mental health as well. Having a fresh, clean home and belongings makes one feel better about themselves and exert more confidence. It gives people a sense of pride and accomplishment and the warmer weather is there to top it all off.


Although cleaning is not the most fun to do during free time, listening to music and taking frequent breaks can make it more bearable. Dusting and vacuuming the house as a family also promotes family bonding and togetherness, a positive added bonus of clearing the dust and dirt from the house.


Spring cleaning is a tradition for some, and a habit for others, myself included. It is a very beneficial activity for a person's overall health and wellness, even if not much cleaning actually is done. (Photo Credit: Caitlin Jefferson)

Springing into cleanliness

Caitlin Jefferson, Staff Reporter
April 10, 2017
Link Crew positively affects the lives of everyone that encounters it, and it will only continue to make a difference in the halls of Mercy as years go by. (Photo Credit: Trish Brown)

A bittersweet ending

Sydney Hughes, Design Editor
April 1, 2017
Harvard University estimates that 1 billion people globally are low in vitamin D. Because humans produce vitamin D primarily by absorbing the sun’s UVB rays, the easiest and simplest way to increase vitamin D levels is by getting outside. (Photo Credit: Brooklyn Rue)

Go outside

Brooklyn Rue, Editor-in-Chief
March 26, 2017
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Mercy High School ~ Farmington Hills, Michigan
Opinion