Out with the old, in with the new

+Although+she+made+friends+easily+during+her+freshman+year%2C%0AKellie+Abeska+%28left%29+says+that+Mercy+was+not+the+fit+for+her+%28Lilly+Blake%29.+

Although she made friends easily during her freshman year, Kellie Abeska (left) says that Mercy was not the fit for her (Lilly Blake).

Lilly Blake, Staff Reporter

After nine years of public schooling, Kellie Abeska entered Mercy in 2012 as a freshman, looking forward to a fresh start and a new way of life. Almost two years later, Abeska started her junior year. This time around, she will not be walking up the flagpole entrance into Mercy, but instead into the halls of Walled Lake Western High School.

“Even though I loved the people that I met at Mercy, I didn’t really love the tight knit environment,” Abeska said. “I felt like transferring to Western would be better for my personal high school experience.”

Freshman Counselor Ms. Trish Brown admitted that in some cases transferring schools can be the best solution. She made the point that students may decide between two schools and later realize they made the wrong choice.

“If an issue cannot be resolved and… transferr[ing] is the best solution, a family may feel that they have no other choice than to leave their current community,” said Ms. Brown.

Senior Brooke Ottaway faced a similar issue. She decided during her freshman year at Grosse Pointe South High School that she would transfer to Mercy for her sophomore year. As a senior, Ottaway has found “an eternal home” and has friendships and memories that will last her a lifetime.

“I know it’s cheesy, but I think everyone has their own path, and Mercy was supposed to be on mine,” Ottaway said with a grin.

Upon hearing Ottaway’s response, Abeska smiled.

“I guess both Mercy and Western are parts of my path,” Abeska said. “I know they’ll each contribute something cool and different to my life.”