The Culture Cuisine Club: a tasteful new group

At+their+first+meeting%2C+members+of+the+Culture+Cuisine+club+%28CCC%29+enjoy+delicious+Bahamian+Johnny+cakes%2C+a+type+of+bread+made+from+cornmeal.+%28Photo+credit%3A+Sydney+Hughes%29
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The Culture Cuisine Club: a tasteful new group

At their first meeting, members of the Culture Cuisine club (CCC) enjoy delicious Bahamian Johnny cakes, a type of bread made from cornmeal. (Photo credit: Sydney Hughes)

At their first meeting, members of the Culture Cuisine club (CCC) enjoy delicious Bahamian Johnny cakes, a type of bread made from cornmeal. (Photo credit: Sydney Hughes)

At their first meeting, members of the Culture Cuisine club (CCC) enjoy delicious Bahamian Johnny cakes, a type of bread made from cornmeal. (Photo credit: Sydney Hughes)

At their first meeting, members of the Culture Cuisine club (CCC) enjoy delicious Bahamian Johnny cakes, a type of bread made from cornmeal. (Photo credit: Sydney Hughes)

Sydney Hughes, Staff Reporter

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Ladies, the time has come. Mercy is finally introducing a club centered around what all Mercy girls love the most: food. The Culture Cuisine Club (CCC) will take over the snack bar during their meetings, eager to appreciate the foods of different cultures. The CCC is designed to celebrate different cultures and ethnicities by combining diversity and food, two of Mercy’s keystones. Junior Clare Brees-Oswald, who serves as president of the CCC, along with several other students and math teacher Ms. Christa Polan, brought the club to life. The idea for the club was actually based on a light-hearted joke from an A-ball group chat.

“I made this A-ball group chat,” stated Brees-Oswald, “and we decided in this group chat that food was amazing and that Mercy girls all love food, and we jokingly [said] ‘Hey let’s start a food club.’ Because I take jokes seriously, I wrote a proposal for it and . . . [administration] liked it.”

During the meetings, food representing different cultures will be served, and discussions will be held about that food’s ingredients and cultural background.

“The plan is to switch it up every month,” stated Hood. “One month, [the meeting] would be in the morning, and the next month’s meeting would be in the afternoon at a restaurant having [food from] that specific culture.”

Since this is a club based in part around sharing food, serving delicious meals is a central part of the orchestration of the club. The founders of the club and Mercy’s chefs are working in unison to create a successful club.

“Chef Mike is totally into the idea,” said Brees-Oswald. “He’s helping us make food in the [cafeteria] and we [will] serve it at the snack bar.”

The CCC was created to heighten awareness and an appreciation for cultures all over the world, whether they are represented in the Mercy community or not. By combining Mercy girls’ favorite thing with cultural appreciation, the desire to join the club and become educated about various cultures is only increased.

“Mercy is a school that prides [itself on] having a diverse group of students,” stated Hood. “Mercy also likes food, so [we thought] ‘Hey this would be a great club. Let’s incorporate. . . a few things about Mercy into a club.'”

 

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