Mercy hopes for McAuley’s canonization

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Latin II and III students worked hard to write persuasive letters in Latin to Pope Francis about Catherine McAuley's canonization. (Photo credit: Katherine Colleran)

Katherine Colleran, Staff Reporter

With Pope Francis’ Holy Year of Mercy beginning Dec. 8, the Catholic Church is expecting to undergo some changes and updates. Already the Pope has announced that priests will be able to absolve women who have had abortions. Students, teachers, and administrators of Mercy High School are also hoping for the canonization of Catherine McAuley.

Catherine McAuley founded the Sisters of Mercy, and many people have written letters in the hope that she will be canonized during this Holy Year of Mercy.

Administration announced that the letters will be put in a book before being sent to Pope Francis by the Sisters of Mercy.

Mercy students in Latin II and III wrote their letters to the Pope in Latin, one of the official languages of the Vatican. According to Latin teacher Mrs. Lauren Marquard, the Pope is more likely to be fluent in Latin than in English.

The two classes spent a few days perfecting their letters about McAuley and her accomplishments before transferring them on to stationary. In their writings, many mentioned that she was an inspiring leader because she took an active role in helping the poor and educating women. She and the rest of the sisters were all strong  in their Catholic faith and known for their compassion. They were among the first to create a home and school for women and children in 19th century Dublin, Ireland.