B.A.S.E. 2.0

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The ladies of B.A.S.E. enjoyed group bonding at Noel Night (Photo Credit: Chanel Taylor).

Chanel Taylor, Staff Reporter

The purpose of B.A.S.E. is to educate and inform people of social injustices, minority issues, and present-day discrimination. It provides a platform for students to share opinions and debate current affairs. This year the board members gave B.A.S.E. an upgrade by inviting new topics, activities, and enhancing atmosphere.

This year’s board members are:  President Ogechi Nwaopara, Vice President Alycia Washington, Treasurer Ann Mark, Secretary Kaylan Grigsby, and Leader of Student Affairs Taylor Hutson.

Topics discussed this semester included colorism, affirmative action, and the media’s portrayal of African-Americans. Members voiced their opinions and received feedback from their peers. Meetings went beyond sitting and talking to one another. The board invited Mercy history and English teachers to lecture and discuss affirmative action. There was also a forum held with U of D’s B.A.S.E. on the topic of colorism.

“We’ve made an effort to make B.A.S.E. more inclusive and inviting of other races,” said Hutson. “These changes were possible because our board is very cohesive and compromising.”

B.A.S.E. saw a growth in members of various races and backgrounds this year. Leaders advertised with school-wide announcements and emails to get new students and teachers to attend meetings and forums.

The advertisements proved effective when sophomore Brooklyn Rue began attending meetings after she heard that B.A.S.E. was open to all races. She went to the affirmative action meeting, and then joined.

“I joined because it was interesting, and I appreciated the teacher interaction,” said Rue. “The format was cool because it was an open discussion that allowed people to voice their opinions.”

Rue is also the co-founder of Mercy’s FEM club, a new club this year which focuses on women’s rights and issues. The leaders of both FEM club and B.A.S.E. have plans of co-hosting meetings later in the year.

“B.A.S.E. has allowed students of other backgrounds to have a better understanding of minorities and has opened communication to talk about real issues,” said Hutson.

The leaders also organized events for members to bond. The group went on a movie night to see Dear White People, participated and performed in the Focus Hope Walk, and attended Noel Night.

The board achieved these changes by meeting at least twice a month, carefully scheduling events, and accepting feedback. They hope to keep the momentum of B.A.S.E. going after they graduate.

“Next year we want the new leaders to do even more than we have this year. We’ve worked so hard, and we want our impact to be lasting,” said Hutson.