APathy

+Ms.+Salvia%27s+AP+European+History+class+is+spending+this+week%0Areviewing+for+their+test+next+Wednesday.++Photo+credit%3A+Jessie+Larouere

Ms. Salvia’s AP European History class is spending this week reviewing for their test next Wednesday. Photo credit: Jessie Larouere

 Ms. Salvia's AP European History class is spending this weekreviewing for their test next Wednesday.  Photo credit: Jessie Larouere
Ms. Salvia’s AP European History class is spending this week
reviewing for their test next Wednesday. Photo credit: Jessie Larouere

Not every senior has been counting down the days until graduation all year. However, in the month of May, many can tell you the exact amount of school days they have left.

Senior shave decided which college they will attend in the fall and their second semester grades do not count towards their cumulative GPA. However, even though the apathy level for the class of 2013 is running high, their rigorous schedules that granted their college acceptances have not changed.

AP tests are set for almost every day for the next two weeks. Scoring high on these tests can mean gaining college credit before one even steps foot on campus. AP tests are scored on a scale of 1 to 5. Many colleges today, however, only accept scores of a 4 or 5 for course credit.

Because of the difficulty of these three-and-a-half-hour tests, many seniors feel that the likelihood of obtaining these scores is very unlikely and are, therefore, not studying for their tests.

“I do the minimum amount of homework for my classes,” said senior Maggie McBrien. “I’m definitely not going to study for my AP test.”

However, the incentive that most Mercy teachers offer for taking the AP exam is being exempt from a final in that class. For many students, especially seniors, this is enough of a reason to spend $76 and half a day.

“I just don’t want to take the final in my AP Euro class,” said senior Keelin Guerin.