Mercy Students Spark Debate at NAIMUN XLIX

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Tori Noble

Tori Noble, Staff Reporter

Over President’s Day Weekend, eight girls from Mercy’s Model United Nations team, chaperoned by Ms. Lisa Robinet, traveled to Washington D.C. for Georgetown University’s North American Invitational Model United Nations conference.

The girls who attended were: sophomore Anjali Alangadan, juniors Liz Lekarzyck, Jennifer Kenner, Erin Eusebi, Katie Denton, and Tori Noble, and seniors Jasmine Weir and Sarah Philo.

The girls debated a wide variety of current issues like climate change, as well as revisited historical issues, attempting to provide an alternative outcome.

Juniors Erin Eusebi and Katie Denton were in such a committee, which attempted to restructure the German government after World War I to prevent the rise of the Nazis to power, and preserve the traditional Weimar culture. Unfortunately, the committee only successfully passed a resolution to increase tax revenue in Germany by legalizing cannabis, although many resolutions were proposed, including one by Eusebi and Denton, which did not pass.

In a re-enactment of the 2002 US Senate, juniors Jennifer Kenner and Tori Noble represented John Kerry and Ted Kennedy respectively, debating the constitutionality of the War Powers Act in it’s relation to troop deployment into Iraq. Although the delegates sought a peaceful solution, the final result was nuclear war.

Junior Liz Lekarzyck participated in a committee that simulated the Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts of Cambodia, where she represented a judge and reviewed cases regarding genocide. The committee was successful in convicting people of genocide.

Senior Sarah Philo and sophomore Anjali Alangaden co-delegated in a simulation of the Pacific Islands Forum, where they sought a resolution to the climate change crisis, which endangers the low-lying islands. The pair won an “Outstanding Delegate” award at the national conference for their efforts.

Senior Jasmine Wehr also won an “Outstanding Delegate” award, for her efforts in the Singapore committee, where they aided in transitioning their government from that of a third world country to that of a first world country.

The girls also visited Washington D.C. landmarks like the Washington Monument, Jefferson Memorial, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt monument. They also visited the new Martin Luther King monument, which featured the prominent civil rights leader carved from white marble, surrounded by some of his most famous quotes engraved into other slabs of stone.

The trip, which occurs annually, was a mix of fun and learning for the students who attended. By combining previous research with the new ideas proposed by others, the students gained a fresh perspective on important issues and sharpened debate skills.