Mercy Survived Sandy

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Travelers at San Francisco International Airport stand in line waiting for a flight home. Thousands of travelers like the Malaney family and Mike Gruber were stranded earlier this week because of Hurricane Sandy. Photo Credit: Dan Honda/Contra Costa Times/MCT

“Post-tropical storm” Sandy wreaked havoc earlier this week as it swept across the eastern part of the United States. A few of Mercy’s own were among the thousands of people trapped by the storm, unable to get to where they needed to be. Thousands of flights were cancelled and delayed and most other forms of transportation were frozen because of the storm.

English teacher Mike Gruber found himself stranded Sunday night in Rhode Island after his flight home was cancelled because of the storm. After a weekend of visiting his daughter, he expected to make it home safely before the storm hit.

“Once we found out we were going to be delayed,” said Mr. Gruber, “Delta told us it would be 24 hours until we could leave. They didn’t realize how much was coming.”

Senior Maggie Malaney and her mother, music teacher Amy Malaney, also found themselves stranded far from home Sunday because of Sandy. After a weekend visiting Maggie’s sister in New York City, the Malaney family was not able to get out of the city. After their flight was cancelled they needed to look for other options.

“We tried the Megabus and renting a car,” said Mrs. Malaney, “but the Megabus wasn’t open and all of the cars were rented.”

After the storm passed, all that was left was destruction. Some places were hit harder than others.

Mr. Gruber explained that Providence, Rhode Island was prepared. In August 1991, Hurricane Bob hit Rhode Island hard and caused serious devastation. The Category Two hurricane prepared the city of Providence for the worst. A surge wall was built and it protected Providence from Hurricane Sandy.

“Rhode Island was on the outskirts of the storm,” added Mr. Gruber, “so we weren’t hit as hard. But even so, winds were about 80 miles per hour and the rain was coming down pretty hard.”

Both Mr. Gruber and the Malaney family made it home safely after the storm passed.

“We finally got home on Tuesday night,” said Mr. Gruber. “Our flight left after four other flights from Detroit left.”

“I’m thankful that I got out,” said Mrs. Malaney, “but it’s scary to think people are still there dealing with this horrible attack.”

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